Porsche Carrera GT 0-60 times

Out of all performance specs, nothing but Porsche Carrera GT 0-60 times can better speak about the vehicle's temper. While horsepower and torque blow smoke in the eyes, Carrera GT zero to sixty specs and average time to run a quarter mile are pretty straightforward metrics allowing to compare against its competitors.

Very often there is no chance of doing Carrera GT 0-to-60 test personally and making conclusions from the experience of the other drivers is the last thing you want.

Conducting a trustworthy test drive requires following a strict methodology that is intended to eliminate the inconsistent circumstances like weather, tires, surface, engine temperature. It is always better to leave it for professionals.


2005 Porsche Carrera GT 0-60 times, all trims

Trim, HP, Engine, Transmission0-60 times1/4 mile times
Base 2dr Rear-wheel Drive Coupe,605 hp

3.5 sec

11.4 @ 126 mph

2004 Porsche Carrera GT 0-60 times, all trims

Trim, HP, Engine, Transmission0-60 times1/4 mile times
Base 2dr Rear-wheel Drive Coupe,605 hp

3.5 sec

11.3 @ 126 mph


Porsche Carrera GT 0-60 mph acceleration across years

Year of a Model0-60 times1/4 mile times
2005

3.5 sec

11.4 @ 126 mph
2004

3.5 sec

11.3 @ 126 mph

In the 1980s, while every other automaker decided to move to the mid-mounted engine when making supercars, Porsche stuck to its rear-engine setting. This was witnessed in the 959. It was not until 1996 that Porsche decided to go with the mid-engine in the 911 GT1 Strassenversion. The first street-legal Porsche supercar was seen later in 2004, and this was the Carrera GT which came with a rear engine.

This particular model saw production until 2006, and it took another 7 years for Porsche to release another supercar, the 918 Spyder. These two last supercars were among the only few high-performance vehicles that rivaled Ferrari’s outstanding Enzo. The Carrera lived to be one of the finest works by Porsche, creating a huge impression on the market in the 2000s.

Porsche equipped the Carrera GT with a 5.7-litre V10. It was originally designed between the year 1998 and 2000 for the Le Mans prototype 9R3, also known as the LMP2000, but never got to race. The design was based on Porsche’s earlier 3.5-litre V10 built in 1992 for Formula 1. The Carrera was able to churn about 612 hp at 8,400rpm. The power was pumped to the rear wheels allowing the six-speed manual transmission to emanate 435 lb-ft of torque at 5,750 rpm. Porsche was the first automaker to equip a car with the Ceramic Composite Clutch which gave the transmission and engine a low COG.

The GT took only 3.8 seconds to hit the 60mph mark and 6.9 secs to get to 100mph. It was rated at 205 mph top speed. It was, however, slower than the Enzo which took only 3.14 seconds to get to 60 mph at 221mph top speed.

One may easily think that the 918 followed its predecessor’s design. However, the two vehicles are quite different. The GT featured a flat deck at its back, taillights that were joined with the raised fenders which then connected to the rear wing. A wide diffuser down below integrated into two huge exhaust pipes, setting the Carrera GT’s design further apart from that of the 911.

A view from the side revealed a somewhat flat body, sculptured door panels, an overhang shorter rear and a long deck at the back. Porsche ensured it offered flexibility thanks to its closed top made of a pair of carbon-fiber panels. Each panel weighed 6.4 pounds and could be removed and stored in the front-cargo compartment.

The GT was available in 5 standard colors: Fayence Yellow, Seal Grey, Guards Red, GT Silver and Basalt Black. There was an additional list of custom colors if customers wished for something else.

Much of the dashboard was built with magnesium, with the top and bottom comprising a piece each. The top part extended towards the door panels on each side, creating a wrap-around ambiance. The production version featured a traditional instrument cluster contrary to the LCD screen seen in the concept car.

Non-magnesium surfaces were made of either carbon-fibre or leather. Porsche was the first automaker to use Kevlar-combined carbon-fibre seats in the Carrera GT. These weighed about half the weight of a normal Porsche seat at just 22.7 pounds.

Buying a Carrera GT means that you have to base your choice on a used car. Having one that still functions well would be a true privilege. You’d be driving around a true gem that turned a lot of eyes in the 2000s.



Porsche Carrera GT specs